Bish Creative – Retail Insights #18

Video

Please enjoy our 18th Retail Insights video!

In this video, Lori Taylor, Senior Solutions Manager of Bish Creative, speaks with Kurt Deck, Senior Creative Display Manager of Kellogg’s Company.

This month’s topic is the evolution and importance of retail displays in the market and how the audience is adapting

Thanks for watching!

Retail Insights #18 The evolution and importance of retail displays in the market and how the audience is adapting.

Lori Taylor:

Hi, my name is Lori Taylor and I am a senior solutions manager here at Bish Creative Display. I have had the pleasure of working with Kurt at Kellogg’s for the last couple of years. Hello, Kurt. Thank you so much for joining us today. We’re excited to have you be a part of this month’s Bish Retail Insight video. So thanks for being here.

 

Kurt Deck:

Yeah Lori, Kurt Deck from Kellogg’s Merchandising Services. Great to be here today. Just a little bit about myself. I’ve been with Kellogg’s for about 34 years. And within that 34 years, I’ve been basically on the sales side, but also, too, on the marketing side. So the nice thing about having the pedigree that I have is I have a lot of exposure how retail works and operates. And then on the marketing side, I can usually really utilize the creativity that is the fun part of the business to come up with solutions and designs when it comes to merchandising. I kind of oversee the merchandising group here at Kellogg. So we work in corrugated displays, metal displays, and plastic. So we cover the whole gamut when it comes to merchandising.

 

Lori Taylor:

So Kurt, my very first question is, how do you make a Snap, Crackle, POP display?

 

Kurt Deck:

Great question. And really, it’s not as easy as you think it is. It takes a lot of people with a lot of passion and a lot of dedication to come together to create that display. So really it starts out with an initiative, and a focus, and where we want to drive the business at retail and with certain brands. So really kind of starts with a great brief from our brand teams and what they want to achieve when it comes to moving the brand to the consumer. And that’s kind of where it starts. And then you work with really, really amazing agencies, creative agencies. And also, too, as we call them display agencies like Bish to help us navigate creativity and try to grab that passion that the brand team has in a brief and make it come to life when it comes to display at retail. And that’s how the Snap, Crackle, POP happens at retail displays.

 

Lori Taylor:

So Kurt, how would you describe the current retail environment?

 

Kurt Deck:

Current retail environment, Lori, is getting much better than 2020. We’ve learned a lot of crazy lessons from 2020, and it put us in a different direction than we are now. The current environment definitely is getting better, but probably is not going as fast as we’d like it in some markets, but it is changed when it comes to how we present our product at retail. It’s going in a good direction. We’re very happy where it’s gone and we’re looking forward to the future.

 

Lori Taylor:

So what do you believe are two of the most important reflections on retail from 2020?

 

Kurt Deck:

Yeah, 2020, it was crazy as we all know. There’s a lot of great lessons that came out in 2020. One was basically the shelf and how important the shelf was when it came to merchandising, and keeping, obviously, product on the shelf when it was really kind of crazy times in the beginning of 2020. And then maintaining it and keeping it to the place where consumers can actually find our product and actually shop it in a crazy environment. The next one would be being nimble and trying to understand the landscape and adjusting our merchandising strategies, and to accommodate to what we receive, and how we had to position our product at retail to the consumers.

 

Because as you know, there’s a lot of clean store policies out there in 2020 that limited the floor space that displays used to take. So we had to basically look at the landscape, the blueprint of the store, and rethink it, and rethink how the shopper shopped. So it actually opened up a couple opportunities for us to think smaller at some locations, to go bigger in others. So it’s actually a good learning process, but I’m sure glad we’re through it this year.

 

Lori Taylor:

So how influential is POP retail in the impulse buying world?

 

Kurt Deck:

When it comes to a POP influence at the retail world, it’s incredibly important, and it’s changing every day. And if you’re not rethinking it, or redesigning it, you’re going to miss the boat. It’s kind of a lifeline of the business. As you know, landscapes changing with retail, people shopping more online, getting delivered to the homes. So when the consumer goes to retail and goes to buy product, it needs to stand out, it needs to be clean and to be clear at retail so the consumer can purchase it. So no longer are the days of just throwing displays out there and hoping that the consumers bump into them. There’s more of a more strategic and more of a sound strategy behind how we design displays and how they’re executed that retail.

 

Lori Taylor:

So how do brands like Pringles and Cheez-Its continue to be market leaders in such a competitive category?

 

Kurt Deck:

Yeah, Cheez-Its and Pringles are monster brands when you work here at Kellogg’s. So we’ve got a lot of things that we’re doing to obviously grow the brand, not only in its base, but also to when it comes to innovation. So you’ll see, like in the Cheez-It world product lines, like Snap’d coming out, so competing more when it comes to like the potato chip occasion with like Frito-Lay. So you’ll see things like that coming from Cheez-It.

 

Pringles is a fun brand. So besides crazy, crazy flavors, you’ll see a different type of advertising coming out for Pringles. We have a real core consumer when it comes to Pringles that we can’t neglect. We’ve got to make sure that we stay current and we have to stay current with the consumer because we know they’re obviously changing all the time. We need to keep up with them. So those two monster brands, there’s a lot of effort here at Kellogg’s to keep those monster brands continuing to grow and be profitable for us. And there is some great, great work in the future for those brands.

 

Lori Taylor:

So how do you tackle display solutions per category, for instance, mass, grocery, convenience?

 

Kurt Deck:

Another great question here. And as you called out there, got three different unique categories when it comes to retail. Mass is much different than convenient and general grocery, or retail is different than the mass. So your merchandising solutions have to be different in each one of them. So mass is constantly changing in the direction they’re going. So you need to be able to stick out, and be easy to go through their network, and get out to sales floor. When it comes to general retail, general retail is obviously competing just like everybody else when it comes to online shopping. Also, they’re being a little more craftier when it comes to merchandising. So you’ll see things like smart displays and technology being utilized when it comes to general retail.

 

And then when you go to convenience, one of the challenges that we’re seeing with convenience, a lot of times convenience stores are tied into gas stations. So everybody has a smartphone nowadays, you can actually go to the pump, put your smartphone in front of the pump and basically start pumping gas. But how do you drive that consumer back into the store to make a purchase? So you really have to work really closely with those retailers to push that opportunity. So when they get into the store, you have to make sure that you’re on a display that really kind of puts your brand in the best position to have that consumer see it so they can make that purchase because they’re not spending a whole lot of time within the store, especially at convenience.

 

Lori Taylor:

So Kurt, what is a recent display success story that you can share with us? And why was it successful?

 

Kurt Deck:

Yeah, one of the most successful displays that we’ve been doing recently is kind of what we call the micro displaying. We’ve been working with Bish on this. What we found in 2020 is again, the environment had changed quite a bit, a lot of clean store policy. But there was also, too, a lot of different spaces throughout the store that we still had an opportunity to merchandise. And so what we’ve always looked at here at Kellogg’s is points of interruption. So how can we create points of interruption throughout the store so the consumer can to see our product or tie it in with … Or see it as a tie-in with another brand.

 

 

So some of the micro displays that we work closely with the Bish team to develop when it comes to like Pringles displays and the RKT treatment displays. These are small micro displays that can be placed throughout the store. So if the consumer is over by the beer section, they see a small strip of Pringles. There’s an opportunity to sell a can Pringles. Or if they’re upfront wanting to check out and they grab a quick snack, there could be an RKT bar up there. Or you go to another part of the section of the store that they could be buying something for the weekend. We just you in a position that can basically tie your product in with not a whole of real estate.

 

So the nice thing about these small micro displays is they’re not display that, “Hey, it’s always going to be in the store and it’s always going to push our sales.” It’s kind of a graduation point. So we start with a micro display. We tried to build upon it to get to a larger display while hopefully keeping the micro displays throughout the store also. So I would say that has probably been our most successful thing in the past year and a half, is really kind of really evaluating the market and then coming to the market with a solution that worked best for Kellogg’s.

 

Lori Taylor:

So what opportunities do you foresee in the ever-changing retail environment for in-store?

 

Kurt Deck:

As I spoke to some of the questions earlier in our conversation here, the environment is constantly changing. We have to stay on top of that with the consumer, again, doing a lot of shopping online and shopping differently. We really have to have displays that work harder for us. So not just a pretty display is going to cut it anymore. It’s got to be a display that’s thoughtfully designed and well engineered. So when the consumer goes in that store, or when they’re busy, it doesn’t take them a while to find that display. It’s really easy, it’s clean, it stands out. And that can actually be some smart technology involved too, so you can possibly communicate with the consumer too.

 

So gone are the days, again, as I called out earlier of just tossing out a pretty display out there and saying, “Hey, it’s going to sell product.” We have to be smarter. We have to actually look forward when it comes to technology and design and trying to make sure when the consumer are in the retail market, and they are in the shopping mode, that is easy for them and it makes sense.

 

Lori Taylor:

So how does merchandising effect the recent trend of people in-store acting as buyers versus shoppers?

 

Kurt Deck:

Lori, yeah, a continuous theme here, we really have to be smarter. And again, gone are the days when a shopper is just going to be moseying around the store, looking for a deal or looking for a possible meal solution, or they have the time. People are constantly going forward. They’re quite busy, but with technology, it’s also to a lot of people that had the time to do other things. So shopping could be far, far, far lower on their list of priorities.

 

So when they do shop, they’re coming into the stores as purchasers. They’re looking for something to buy, they’ve done their homework. They know they have a deal in a particular store. They know what they want. They’ve got to find it. So you need to develop displays that can draw them in quickly, either with a neat design from a graphic standpoint, or maybe possibly work with like a beacon technology that draws them in from their phone and tells them, “Hey, the display’s over here that you’re looking for that has the brand that you’re looking for.” So again, the future’s constantly changing, we have to evolve with that and we also have to design and develop displays that accommodate that.

 

Lori Taylor:

Well, in closing, Kurt, I wanted to thank you for joining us. It’s been a pleasure working with you over the years. It’s been fun. We’ve worked on a lot of amazing projects. And as you spoke on earlier, all of the Pringles and Rice Krispie Treat, and the cereal in a cup and Cheez-It strips, those have been really exciting. It’s fun to see those in the stores. And I look forward to creating more amazing displays with you.

 

Kurt Deck:

Thank you, Lori, it’s been really great working with Bish. You can see how the team has evolved and has changed. And the displays and concepts and designs that the Bish team is bringing to the table is definitely first-class, and definitely is forward thinking. So that’s why we look to Bish as one of our premium suppliers that we go to to find solutions that help us get to the market and drive our sales. So couldn’t find a better group to work with. So, thank you.

 

 

Read More →

Bish Creative – Retail Insights #17

Video

Please enjoy our 17th Retail Insights video!

In this video, President & CEO of Bish Creative, Jerry Fox, explains the history and importance of the OMA Shop! Awards.

This month’s topic is The history and importance of the OMA Shop! Awards

Thanks for watching!

Retail Insights #17 The History and Importance of the OMA Shop! Awards transcript

Jerry Fox:

Hello again, my name is Jerry Fox, president and CEO of Bish Creative Display. We’re halfway through 2021. We all know what 2020 brought us and 2021 has an amazing and bright future ahead of us. Today I’d like to share with you the story of the OMA, Outstanding Merchandising Awards. This is the awards for the best creative displays in the industry throughout our entire world.

This award dates back to the early 1960s and is based off the Olympics. There’s a gold, silver and bronze. There’s also various segments, hardware, cosmetics, wine and spirits. They also are judged by some of the most prestigious members in our industry, where they are critiquing the uniqueness of each piece and where they succeed in the marketplace.

It is very difficult to win a gold and we won seven this year. There are also three different categories temporary, semi-permanent, and permanent. This year, we won an amazing 22 awards. We won a global award which means we had the best of the best in the entire world. We won the creative award. This is the fifth time Bish Creative has won this award. We won the budget award. This is the third time we won that. Both of those stand for being the most creative in their category and industry and in throughout the entire show as well as the most cost-effective piece in the show. So to win one of each is very impressive, but what’s most impressive to me is winning display of the year. It’s our equivalent to winning the best picture Oscar for our industry.

This year, there are only three options to win in temporary, semi-permanent, and permanent. We won two of them. We won for the Aviation Gin stair-step display in semi-permanent and of course this beautiful Jefferson’s Ocean piece in the temporary category. No company our industry has ever won two in the same year. So we’re incredibly proud of that.

So I’d like to take a moment to thank the Shop! organization for putting together an amazing virtual show, I’d like to thank and congratulate all of our other contestants for they are the ones that keep upping our game. I’d also like to thank my Bish team. They’re the best in the industry. I tell them that every day and they know it. They are passionate and drive each and every day to be the best of the best.

And finally, I’d like to congratulate and thank our clients for the trust and confidence in Bish Creative. We wouldn’t be here without you and we consider yourself true partners. So that is the story of the OMAs. Til next time.

Read More →

Experience Retail Again

Video

The assignment was to create a Pringles multipurpose grab and go display that could work in any retail environment and capture impulse buys with creative merchandising. The display would be visible on glass doors, gondolas, and all registers. Made from a multi cavity injection molded tool, this piece was manufactured in a way where reruns and additional runs could happen in a short period of time. Extreme engineering went into the development of this piece: it needed to rest comfortably in a horizontal fashion so the consumer could easily remove the can from the display and replace if needed.

 

These displays allow retailers and business owners the opportunity to place them prominently throughout the store.

 

Proud winner of the Silver OMA Award in the Semi-Permanent Category

Read More →

Bish Creative – 2021 Shop Awards OMA

News

We would love to congratulate all of the 2021 Shop! Awards winners.

The retail industry is always changing, and we are excited to be a part of this evolution. It’s rewarding to see how the competition has grown through the years.
Our 2020 Virtual Showcase was a huge hit and we’d like to show our 2021 entries along with our winners in the same engaging way!

Have fun exploring our award-winning displays!

2021 Bish Creative 360 Virtual Showcase video transcription

Hello again, my name is Jerry Fox, president and CEO of Bish Creative Display. 2020 is behind us. Thank you. It’s been a challenging year, but amazing for so many different reasons. Welcome to the 2021 Shop! OMA showcase. We obviously live in a virtual world now. It’s only obvious that we continue on with a virtual show. Naturally, we would love each and every one of you to touch and feel and see the exciting and engaging work that we’ve created at Bish Creative this past year. So please find this tour to be something exciting and different.

The OMA’s go back to the 1960s. It stands for outstanding merchandising awards of which Bish Creative Display has won several. In fact, we consider ourselves the leaders in award-winning innovative design. But today’s world, it means something different. Why? Because you have to be different. Today’s consumer is looking for exciting, engaging interactive merchandising that speaks to the brand, speaks to the occasion that they’re purchasing the product for and speaks to the world we live in today.

The future of marketing at retail will be a social, digital and physical experience. Therefore at Bish Creative, we pride ourselves in being the leaders in creating that point of difference. The retail future is exciting. It’s never been a better time and I personally have never been so excited. If you have any needs or wants or desires to learn more about Bish Creative Display, we encourage you to reach out for we are here, we have survived, for we are here for the long haul. Welcome again to the 2021 Shop! OMA showcase. Enjoy the tour.

Read More →

Bish Creative – Retail Insights #16

Video

Please enjoy our 16th Retail Insights video!

In this video, Jacquelyn Staples, Associate Marketing Manager of Bish Creative and Mark D’Avirro, VP of Sales for Coty Luxury talk about the ever-changing retail environment.

This month’s topic is The Ever-changing Retail Environment

Thanks for watching!

Listen to full length interview

Retail Insights #16 The Ever-Changing Retail Environment transcription

Jacquelyn:
Thank you Mark, for joining us at Bish on one of our insights videos here. While we wish we could do this in person and visit you in lovely Fort Lauderdale, it’s still a fantastic to see you, and thank you so much.

Mark:
Thank you, Jacque and everyone at Bish for inviting me. My name is Mark D’Avirro. I’m the vice president of sales for Coty Luxury, and I lead the field team for department store and luxury department stores. I’ve been at Coty for the past four years now, but I’ve been in the beauty and fragrance industry now 34 years. It truly is the only career that I know, and it’s one that I love, deeply, and I’m super passionate about, and it’s been good to me.

Jacquelyn:
Given your large experience and everything, the greatest change, in the last 12-18 months, what do you believe are some of the most important reflections from that time?

Mark:
There’s two things that really stand out to me from 2020, especially. Don’t ever underestimate the power of fragrance. Scent is the new touch in many ways, and when so many people felt confined or isolated, they were in quarantine, or lockdown and really in a very closed environment of their home or their apartment. Fragrance offered them the opportunity to feel comfort, to escape to the beach, or to the mountains. If people weren’t able to be in touch with their moms, or dads, or close family members, one spritz could take you and transport you to that moment that you treasured or remembered with a family member or on a vacation that you were. So, it’s no surprise that fragrance has really been the shining star of the pandemic in many ways when you look at retail.

Mark:
So, it’s been exciting to see that happen. What’s also been amazing to see, is the digital experience that consumers now are able to engage in and that they have. In 2020, I got hooked on TikTok, and what I found was, it wasn’t just a place to go and record dance videos. It’s now become a major platform for so many companies to engage with the most desired consumer, which is the gen Z and the millennials. They have such an amazing influence on products, and what they desire, and what they want. And on TikTok, 50% of those that are on the TikTok platform are 34 and under. It has been a incredible platform for companies to advertise, engage with consumer, and it really rose to center stage, over the past year, as one of the most desired platforms for advertising and engagement.

Jacquelyn:
I agree it really has totally expanded. And one of the only ways to really reach some of those younger generations as well, that only know how to shop that way, and are completely immersed in that. Going back to your comment around the scent memories and the things that are brought up when you just realize, you’re like, “Oh, I’ve totally forgotten about that. And that was such a great experience” or, “Oh, that sounds like my grandmother and I miss her.”

Mark:
Yep. Fragrance is all about feelings, and emotions, and moods. With just a spritz or a spray of something that you enjoy wearing, it can really change your mood. It can lighten up the mood, you can wear something lighter, something a little richer, depending on how you’re feeling. It really is amazing how fragrance can really transport you and really change a feeling or enhance a feeling that you already have.

Jacquelyn:
Going back to this social, digital, one of the new buzz words, phygital, omni-channel types of marketing. How do you see this continuing to change, now, as we’re coming out of that pandemic?

Mark:
I think what I’ve seen with the pandemic, I think what we’ve all seen, is the customers looking for alternative ways to shop. They want to be able to choose how they shop, and what we’ve seen happened last year is so many different options were offered to the consumer almost forced. We saw the e-comm business and the dot com business really advance due to COVID. It was headed in that direction over the next few years, you would have seen the increased penetration of shoppers that go to those e-commerce sites, but COVID forced a fast track, in a sense. Now you’ve got a lot of people that maybe had not been familiar with shopping online that had no other choice, because stores were closed. Now they’ve engaged in that experience. Now they add that to their menu of how they shop.

Mark:
Also, curbside, right? Curbside shopping. It’s been out there for some time, in some retailers, not everyone had engaged in that kind of shopping experience, but now every retailer is offering curbside shopping. Same day delivery! With just one click, you can have the product that you’re looking for in just a few hours.

Mark:
I think it’s all going to be about options, and a menu of options, and being able to kind of curate for yourself, how you shop. For me, I like a combination. I like them all. I shop online. I love shopping in store because I still believe, and we still see, that there is a need for a human connection, and that only an in store experience can offer that. That consumer, who still wants to go in store and experience a human connection and touch and feel, that’s still going to be part of our shopping experience going forward. But you’re going to see a lot of different things come up on digital. I even read somewhere recently, artificial intelligence, like an AI experience. I think that there’s so many options that so many companies are looking into, that you’re going to start to see come forward over the next three to five years.

Jacquelyn:
Yes. It is exciting and wonderful to see how adaptive the market has been. I went shopping this weekend and absolutely it was like, “Oh, I totally missed this.” You can’t get the full experience. You can’t smell something over the internet. You don’t have the expertise with all the options. You need somebody sometimes to just help you narrow down some details.

Mark:
What we found is once stores have started to reopen, they were welcoming, they were safe environments, and the consumer went on buying trips. It was different. He or she didn’t go to the mall or go to a store in a sense to go shopping. They went to go buying. That’s really a lot of what we’re seeing right now is that consumer who is there, their intent is to buy. They walk in with lists, and they walk in with products in mind, and they want to be able to go in, have that experience, and leave with those products. So, it’s been really exciting to see, and the business has been robust, especially in fragrance, also in home, and you’re also seeing it in fine jewelry as well.

Jacquelyn:
How do you think merchandising in-store will now change and be effected by how these buyers are now in the stores versus shoppers?

Mark:
I think that it’s all about surprising and delighting the consumer. Any way that you can merchandise, especially when I think about beauty, because that’s where my expertise is. It’s in the beauty and fragrance arena, and it’s really all about getting the customer’s attention and luring them over toward your counter, or towards your product. You want to do things that are surprising, that are delightful, that are engaging. And it’s all about basics and fragrance. The tester needs to be there, but it’s also about new innovation. We’ve seen some, some different ways where the customer now can experience the scent, maybe from a sticker that we hand to them, or from a diffuser that is disguised in the way of a tester unit of some sort.

Mark:
There’s been a number of different innovations that we’re starting to see, but it’s all about grabbing their attention when they walk in that door and luring them over with something that is really engaging, and bright, and playful. That’s what I think. That is really things that we’re starting to see, and that we’ve always wanted to do. So, no surprise, nothing different in a sense, but just how do you do it bigger, better, faster.

Jacquelyn:
Yeah. I definitely have seen the experience has changed a lot now out in the world shopping, and I think that’ll continue to grow and just be even more exciting and inviting for those buyers versus those shoppers. What do you personally want to see as some of these next level opportunities in store?

Mark:
The next level opportunity is how do we up our game on the client experience? How do you entertain, in a sense. I like to think of ourselves in the beauty and fragrance industry as entertainers. In many ways the customer, when they come in, they want a bit of a show, and they want to be entertained, and they want to have that feeling, and they also want expertise, right? So, we’ve got to up our game on our knowledge of everything that’s going on in the world and in the industry that might impact that conversation that takes place between a sales associate and a consumer. Knowledge and education is still powerful. I’m seeing a lot of investment out there happening on education. I think the customer also is going to be looking again for a virtual experience, as well as an in-store experience.

Mark:
When you start to come out of COVID, I don’t see the virtual experience going away. That’s now been introduced to the customer. So, how do we up our game on what that looks like, so that when a customer doesn’t want to go to a store and they want to engage in a virtual event or a virtual education experience, whether it be on a retailers platform or whether it be via Instagram or Facebook live, whatever. How does that get leveled up? Because that has now been introduced, and there’s no way, once you introduce something, no one wants you to take your toys away, right? So, now we’re playing with that toy along with all of our other toys and we can’t take it away, we’ve got to improve it.

Jacquelyn:
Can you share with us a retail experience that you really enjoyed? Why and how you take that back to your own every day.

Mark:
There’s one that comes top of mind and it was recent over the past few years. I am always been a big box shopper. I love department store. I love shopping in those specialty department stores, but over the past few years, I’ve discovered the smaller footprint. These more boutique shops, and there’s one that’s close to where I live, it’s called State and Liberty. It’s a men’s, I think they only do men’s right now, men’s clothing store, and they specialize in a certain fit. I’ve been shopping with them now, really religiously in a sense, because of the experience I had when I walked into their store here in Fort Lauderdale. First of all they put a… In Florida you can do this because the weather is warm, they have a mannequin out front dressed with one of their shirts that says, “Touch me, feel me.”

Mark:
It’s all about touching that product before you even walk in the store. Once you walk in, the knowledge that the sales person had in explaining why that product feels that way, why it’s constructed that way, immediately helped me understand what their products were all about. And then taking it to the next level of, I can create something that is custom fit for you. What you see there, if you try it on and you want it tweaked, we can do that for you. This is all about you getting what you want, not us telling you what you should have. That just blew me away. That was the game changer for me. Like, “Wow, I can come here. I can shop. And I can almost tweak the product to feel right for me.”

Mark:
So, that was amazing, and it just was an experience of let me show you, but let me stand back while you also experience it yourself. For me that as the best shopping experience. The shopping experience for me, that is ultimate is: I get a ‘hello’ when I walk in the door, I get some knowledge upfront. I’m allowed to then on my own shop, and experience, and ask questions, and at the end, I get a ‘thank you’ as I leave. Then how about an email or a phone call that comes three or four days later, that’s just checking in with me? I love all that. And that to me, I think is the ultimate shopping experience. Large businesses, the department stores, they do an amazing job as well. I’m not discounting that, the experience I get there is incredible, but sometimes I want more of an intimate one-on-one experience and a lot these smaller boutique shops are able to offer that. And I’ve had some really great experiences out there.

Jacquelyn:
The market was kind of very stagnant up until COVID and then rapidly changed and advanced. How do you think they’re going to keep that momentum of being able to adapt more easily and continue this as they see these things changing without such a massive requirement for it to change?

Mark:
Right. I think first of all, the consumer is going to guide us. They’re going to tell us what they want and start to show that. And as a trend starts, it’s going to be important that retailers and companies that produce products and distribute, are keen on those early signs of what a consumer is looking for. Whether it’s in a product or whether it’s an experience, and then be able to be ready for when that really takes hold. I think what we’ve all learned is we’ve got to be able to pivot quickly. So COVID, which was such a, to your point, it put us up against the wall and advanced things. But I think now, what I think we’ve learned is, we’ve got to be ready for even those smaller moments of change that can really turn into monumental change.

Mark:
I think that what’s going to be interesting to see, also, is as things open up and consumers go back to experiences; dining out, vacations, which could now change where people spend their money. It’s so important that the experience that the consumer has gotten now during COVID, that that evolves and continues. It’s got to be welcoming, it’s got to be comfortable, it’s got to still be safe, and it’s got to be able to again, be surprising and delightful. There’s no reason why experience shopping, which was always geared towards trips, and vacations, and dining. Experience shopping also applies to what happens in department store. It’s all about making sure that that experience continues, and stays there, and also evolves based on what the customer’s telling us that he or she wants.

Jacquelyn:
Yes. I’m excited to continue to see these changes as I’m shopping, because I feel like it’s opened a whole new door for retail and merchandising. Before, where there were limitations, now it’s completely open. I think it’s a very exciting time for retail. So-

Mark:
Well, what started out as a retail apocalypse when COVID happened, has now turned into, I think, a very exciting time for retail. It was an opportunity for so many companies to kind of reset and almost rethink, what does the experience look like, and have the customer tell us what experience they want. I’m so optimistic about the future of retail and all that it has to offer, and couldn’t be more thrilled with how things are evolving and how COVID fast tracked that. Let’s continue to move forward and see how the experience is going to be surprising for us.

Jacquelyn:
If there was any other closing remarks or anything else you wanted to end with, let us know.

Mark:
My closing remarks are, “Go shopping! Get out there and have the experience! Get what you want from your retailers and just have fun doing it!”

Read More →

Top 7 Types of Displays and what they’re used for

News

Top 7 Types of Displays and what they’re used for

What exactly is a retail display and why do they matter? A retail display, also known as a POS Display (Point of Sales) or POP (Point of Purchase) display, is anything in a store that houses or promotes a product. Visual merchandising strategy focuses heavily on retail design and the appearance of merchandising displays in order to persuade shoppers to purchase specific products or increase visibility on brand messaging. As a consumer, we may not think about the details that go into in-store design, but there’s a whole science behind how consumers shop, how brands can creatively push their products and messaging with in-store displays.

Materials play a big role in retail displays, some popular materials for merchandising displays are wood, metal, acrylic, corrugate and iron. While corrugate tends to be less expensive than other materials, the recent transition to wood, metal and iron has given displays more depth and detail, allowing them to stand out. There is also an increased focus on sustainability, and therefore recycled materials and eco-friendly displays have grown in demand and use. In addition these displays often have interchangeable pieces to update graphics/product for holiday and seasonal use.

Brands are doing all they can to quickly capture the shopper’s attention and promote engagement, especially in the current market where time spent in retail environments is lessening. Phygital, the combination of the word physical and digital. This implies there is some sort of tangible but electronic/digital component integral to the display. Examples of this might be a motion-activated experience or a QR code that links to a web page and lets the shopper learn more about the product right on their smart-phone.

While innovation and engagement are key to the current retail display game, it’s equally important to understand the different types of displays and to know when to use each one. Just remember, this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to creative retail design. If you’re looking for a new innovative way to showcase your brand or product, we’d love to hear from you!

Here are the top seven most popular displays we’re going to cover:
1. End-Caps
2. Free-Standing Displays
3. Countertop Displays
4. Pallet Displays
5. Power Wing Display
6. Dump Bins
7. Inline Displays

Merchandising End-Caps:

End-caps are a product display placed at the end of each aisle which encourage impulse buying and give brands a competitive advantage by providing increased visibility. Picture this, you’re walking through the grocery store, you’ve grabbed everything on your list and you’re heading to the check-out counter. Then suddenly you’re faced with a Frito-Lays Potato Chip display at the end of an aisle. If chips weren’t on your list, chances are they are now. End-caps tend to be fixtures, permanent displays or semi-permanent displays and can be seen in tons of retail environments such as grocery stores, pharmacies, convenient stores, and big-box stores. This high traffic, large volume piece of retail is every brand’s dream placement. 

Free-Standing Display Units:

Free standing display units (FSDU) are exactly what their name would suggest. These displays stand directly on the ground throughout the store and are intended to draw attention to certain products and specific brand messaging. Free standing displays can be permanent displays, seasonal displays or temporary displays. Examples of a free-standing seasonal display would be a Jose Cuervo Holiday Nutcracker piece, or football themed Bud Light or Frito Lay display strategically placed by the store entrance right before the Super Bowl. Free-standing display units can also be seen in all types of retail environments such as grocery stores, pharmacies, convenient stores, big box stores and department stores.

Countertop Display Units:

While we mentioned impulse shopping for end-caps, countertop displays focus even more on the theory that if we put the product directly in front of the consumer, they’re more likely to buy. Like free-standing floor displays, in an effort to engage consumers countertop displays tend to have higher impulse items and hold relevant products for the time of year. Usually, material is decided by the lifecycle of the display and type of store plus how long it’s expected to stay in-store. Popular materials for countertop displays are metal, wire, acrylic and vacuum formed pieces. Countertop displays can be found in virtually any retail environment, from your typical grocery store, big-box store, convenient stores and pharmacies, to department stores, small mom and pop retail settings and everything in between.

Pallet Displays:

Pallet displays utilize a full-size pallet base, and displays product and messaging details printed on the display. These displays are very efficient as they are shipped as is with products already in-place, retailers just need to place the display where they want it and open up the appropriate sections to display the product. Due to this setup time savings, pallet displays tend to fall into the PDQ display category (pretty darn quick). Generally needing more floor space than other types of displays, pallet displays are very popular in big-box or department stores.

Power Wing Displays:

Power wing displays, also known as sidekick displays, are often attached to end-caps to promote relevant add-on items. Power wing displays can be very effective as they promote products that go well with the product it’s accompanying. The example you see above, reminds consumers who are purchasing wine, to not forget the beer and hard alcohol. Power wing displays are great for any type of retail environment, as they really encourage those relevant add-on purchases while maximizing floor space.

Dump Bins:

Dump bins are a free-standing floor display that essentially have a space filled where products are dropped in and easily grabbed by consumers. The large printed pieces allow for high visibility branding and messaging to attract customer’s attention quickly. These displays tend to be large to hold a lot of product, so they demand a decent amount of floor space. Dump bins can be seen in convenient stores, grocery stores, pharmacies and big-box stores.

Inline Displays:

Where there is limited space, inline displays shine! While floor standing displays need an ample amount of space, inline displays are attached directly to aisle shelves. These efficient displays utilize a strategy called shelf management, where they essentially maximize existing shelf visibility to more efficiently stock products. Inline displays, also known as shelf displays, draw consumer attention to a brand or product and encourage them to grab your product over your competitor’s right nextdoor! Inline displays can be found anywhere there are shelves, so pretty much any retail environment you can think of!


Now that we’ve gone into some detail of the top seven retail displays, next time you’re walking through a store, pay attention to what’s around you and how it impacts your shopping experience! Maybe we’re biased, but we think it’s pretty cool how retail environments can persuade and influence consumer behavior without us even noticing.

Now let’s talk about your brand and how our approach to creative retail displays will help build your brand’s visibility!

Read More →

Bish Creative – Drinkworks Case Study

News

Your personal in-home bartender | Drinkworks!

The merchandiser includes a digital screen with looped video and audio to show the consumer how the machine functions, the assortment of cocktails, and draws the consumer in to interact with the replica machine sitting on the counter.

The concept of a well-crafted, tasteful alcoholic cocktail made from a concentrated liquid is fascinating and relevant for today’s world. This type of convenience cocktail making is the wave of the future. The Drinkworks machine is made for the consumer that doesn’t spare expense when it comes to their adult beverages. It is the category leader for premium cocktails made at the push of a button, and the in-store merchandiser is built with the same high-end look and feel to coincide with the premium brand identity.

Easily interchangeable panels and artwork have made these pieces  a staple for stores that continue to engage and attract customers. From product launch to expansion of flavors the versatility in these displays has been able to accommodate and grow with the brand.

Client: Keurig-Dr. Pepper and AB InBev
Brand:
Drinkworks
New Product Launch
Main Channel:
Specialty Retailers & Services
Awards/ Recognition:
2020 Shop!
Year:
2019
Type:
Permanent Display
Main Materials:
Wood, Steel
Merchandising Type:
Permanent

Read More →

Evolution of Retail | Bish Creative

News

Evolution of Retail | Bish Creative

The retail environments we are now familiar with have evolved a lot over time. If you look back, you’ll notice several aspects of in-store shopping that have changed over time, from expanding aisle width to accommodate carts, to interactive displays using advanced technology to grab consumer’s attention. We may be biased, but here at Bish Creative we think the evolution of retail is fascinating, so we decided to share some of the highlights.

Where retail began – 1700s: It all began when “mom and pop” shops opened up in the 1700s-1800s. They were very small drug stores or general stores offering medications, groceries and even fabrics and toys! These stores were family-owned, independent businesses that started the retail and shopping experience we come to love today. Mom and pop shops generally focused on specific categories, products or services, whether that was a pharmacy, a butcher or an agriculture supply shop, so consumer’s would need to visit multiple stores to gather what they needed.

Department Stores – 1800s: As the United States expanded and populations moved west, there was an increased need for retail environments spread across the growing country. Businesses were booming! In response to ever-increasing demand and the ongoing effort to improve the shopping experience, department stores became popular in the mid 1800s to early 1900s. Stores including Macy’s (1858), Bloomingdales (1861), and Sears (1886) began popping up in cities like New York City and Chicago. Curiously, stores back then didn’t just sell items, they also offered demonstrations, lectures and entertainment events to appeal to the wealthy community. Imagine, going into Sears to learn about the new washer and dryer systems – very different from the online appliance shopping many of us experience today! Today the experience while shopping is coming back to the forefront of the shopping.

Birth of the Supermarket – 1850s: Where shoppers used to visit multiple small shops to buy all their food and groceries, and Department Stores grew in popularity, large grocery stores, known as supermarkets, did the same. Jewel Osco (1899), Kroger (1883) and Piggly Wiggly (1916) stores started popping up. These chain stores allowed consumers to visit one location for all their groceries, including fresh meat, produce and dairy, plus packaged food and home goods. These larger supermarkets encouraged purchasing more in one visit, and therefore delivered another iconic shopping feature we all take for granted. In 1937, the introduction of the shopping cart revolutionized the in-store experience. Grocery stores were even forced to widen their aisles to accommodate the extra need of space.

Shopping Malls and Big Box Stores – 1950s: Shopping malls and big box stores made their appearance in the 1950s – 1960s. During this time people went to the mall to socialize, in addition to shopping. A family could enjoy the entire day at the mall – visiting stores, relaxing by the fountain while snacking on lunch and finally going to the movie theater.

While people loved the experience and social aspect of shopping malls, there was a growing need for big box stores which offered all the essentials, oftentimes at a discounted price. Walmarts, Targets and K-marts grew in popularity and added new locations, generally in close proximity to populated cities.

The Age of Technology – 1990s: As technology continued to advance, the consumer experience evolved with it. E-commerce sales became popular in the 1990s and have only continued to grow with the introduction of smartphones and mobile tablets. Amazon started in 1995 merely as an online bookseller, but has grown into the preeminent online store experience, offering almost every product imaginable. A number of retailers have since jumped on the e-commerce bandwagon for many reasons, one of which was to continue growing brand visibility and awareness. The convenience factor and efficiency to compare prices, read reviews is hard to beat.

Today – 2021: Today, we see more retail innovations that leverage a physical display and also utilize technology, sometimes referred to as phygital, or physical with a digital presence. We saw growth in interactive store displays and experiences. While many of us have not experienced the product demonstrations that were popular back in the 1950s, we are very used to reviews and influences or research the consumer on the brand website or social networks.

As a result of an increasing number of online stores, and in the context of the COVID Pandemic, there has been a sharp increase in e-commerce for consumers globally and a new mostly digital normal for the retail world. Once the dust settles, we can expect that much of this new online activity to remain, but brick and mortar stores will always have the distinct advantages. In many segments, shoppers want to touch and feel the products and also yearn for a destination experience and currently a reason to get out of the house.

While we fully expect that brick and mortar shopping experience to always be superior, we’d be ignorant to think the evolution of retail ended there. There will also likely continue to be more hybrid experiences, where products will be promoted and discovered online and then progressed into a store visit for the final review and purchase. With the increase of virtual reality, interactive videos and 360 views, we are most likely going to see this continue to grow, and here at Bish we’re excited for it.

We’ve gone a long way since the 1700s, and there’s always room for improvement as technology advances. We’re excited for innovation and imagination to push retail experiences and environments further than ever before.

Resources:
https://www.flexengage.com/blog/the-evolution-of-retail-a-look-back-and-a-look-ahead/
https://mi9retail.com/evolution-retail-last-millennium/
https://www.bigcommerce.com/blog/retail/#the-history-and-evolution-of-retail-stores

 

Read More →

Bish Creative – Retail Insights #15

News

Please enjoy our 15th Retail Insights video.

President & CEO of Bish Creative Jerry Fox, as he says goodbye to 2020 and hello to 2021.

This month’s topic is Welcome to 2021.

Thanks for watching!

Retail Insights #15 Welcoming 2021 transcript

Jerry Fox:
Hello again, my name is Jerry Fox, President and CEO of Bish Creative Display. Welcome to 2021. It’s been a very difficult year and we cherish the lives we lost and cherish those who served and suffered during this pandemic. Someday, all of us will look back at 2020 and realize what we learned. We learned patience. We learned we cannot get everything we want, when we want it. How many of you had to print out a picture of something to give away as a gift during the holidays because it didn’t arrive in time. We learned respect. We learned to shop with masks on and be respectful of each other.

Jerry Fox:
If you go back in time and look at pictures of when your younger to when you’re older, you’ll see that the one part of your body that doesn’t change is your eyes. So as the saying goes, the eyes have it.

Jerry Fox:
We also learned to persevere. We learned to move forward; go in a different direction. The new normal is the normal, so we did notice some things that are changing over the past few weeks. Traffic is up on the streets. If you look at the highways and byways of life as people are getting back to a hustle and bustle. Sales in many categories are up; food, hardware, alcohol, not so surprised on the last one.

Jerry Fox:
Certain retail categories will struggle. Fashion will be an industry that will struggle for quite some time were we’ve learned to go through life in a casual manner. Other categories will continue to grow. We have one client that’s increased their order of craft beer tap handles. Why? Because they believe and know that once we are able to go into a bar, a cold draft beer will be required.

Jerry Fox:
My advice to retailers, your chance to change is now. If you’ve changed nothing over the past 10 months, change now. As the saying goes, hindsight is 2020. We will all look back someday and realize 2020 taught us more than we expected. As our friends at Frederick Wildman and Pol Roger say, “One bottle is not enough.” Cheers till next time.

 

Read More →

Bish Creative – Retail Insights #14

News

Please enjoy our 14th Retail Insights video!

In this video, the grandson to Bish founder Lorenz Buescher, Randy Buescher and current Bish President/CEO Jerry Fox chat about technology

This month’s topic is how Bish Creative has leveraged technology and pioneered innovation through the years.

Thanks for watching!

Read More →

Ok, you asked for it!

Prepare to be blown away!

Give us some info & we’ll get started!

     

    Get ready to win some awards!

    Ok, you asked for it!

    Prepare to be blown away!

    Give us some info & we’ll get started!

       

      Get ready to win some awards!